Meat based diet

Peer-Reviewed Scientific Articles​

Consuming an All-Meat Ketogenic Diet for the Long-Term Management of Candida Vulvovaginitis and Vaginal Hidradenitis Suppurativa: A 47-Month Follow-Up Case Report

URL: https://www.cureus.com/articles/119195-consuming-an-all-meat-ketogenic-diet-for-the-long-term-management-of-candida-vulvovaginitis-and-vaginal-hidradenitis-suppurativa-a-47-month-follow-up-case-report
Journal: Cureus
Publication Date: 10/2022
Summary: This case report describes long-term therapeutic management in a 33-year-old diagnosed with Candida vulvovaginitis and vulvar hidradenitis suppurativa 47 months previously. Candida spp. yeasts are part of many women’s normal vaginal microflora, and the development of vulvovaginal candidiasis is typically a result of a disturbance in the patient’s microbial ecosystem, which manifests itself by intense pruritus, erythema, swelling, and thick white vaginal discharge. Hidradenitis suppurativa is a chronic auto-inflammatory skin condition that causes painful weeping lesions in areas of dense apocrine glands. Although certain mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of Hidradenitis Suppurativa (e.g., risk factors include smoking, obesity, and family history) have been investigated, a definitive explanation remains elusive.

Nutritional intervention in the form of an all-meat ketogenic diet may be considered therapy in the management of both diseases, as successfully seen in this case report. The patient refused standard of care with oral fluconazole for Candida vulvovaginitis and surgical removal for Hidradenitis suppurativa, and instead consumed a zero-carbohydrate all-meat ketogenic diet mostly of beef with strict adherence to the diet for 43 days in which symptoms ceased.

Key Takeaways

Hidradenitis Suppurativa is a skin infection that occurs in areas of the body with skin folds/creases such as the armpit, groin, vulva, etc where the skin becomes red, painful, and drains pus. This patient had hidradenitis suppurativa and a yeast infection in her vulva and vaginal region. She refused antibiotics, and instead did a carnivore diet. After 43 days of the carnivore diet, her symptoms were gone and the infections cleared.

Carnivore Diet Improves Yeast and Skin Infections

Behavioral Characteristics and Self-reported Health Status Among 2029 Adults Consuming a “Carnivore Diet”

URL: https://academic.oup.com/cdn/advance-article/doi/10.1093/cdn/nzab133/6415894

Journal: Current Developments in Nutrition

Publication Date: 11/2021

Summary: The “carnivore diet,” based on animal foods and excluding most or all plant foods, has attracted recent popular attention. However, little is known about the health effects and tolerability of this diet, and concerns for nutrient deficiencies and cardiovascular disease risk have been raised. We obtained descriptive data on the nutritional practices and health status of a large group of carnivore diet consumers. A social media survey was conducted March 30 to June 24, 2020 among adults self- identifying as consuming a carnivore diet ≥ 6 months. Survey questions interrogated motivation, dietary intake patterns, symptoms suggestive of nutritional deficiencies or other adverse effects, satisfaction, prior and current health conditions, anthropometrics, and laboratory data.  A total of 2029 respondents (median age 44 years, 67% male), reported consuming a carnivore diet for 14 (interquartile range 9–20) months, motivated primarily by health reasons (93%). Red meat consumption was reported ≥ daily by 85%. Under 10% reported consuming vegetables, fruits or grains > monthly, and 37% denied vitamin supplement use. Prevalence of adverse symptoms was low (<1% to 5.5%). Symptoms included gastrointestinal (3.1–5.5%), muscular (4.0%), and dermatologic (1.1–1.9%). Participants reported high levels of satisfaction and improvements in overall health (95%), wellbeing (69–91%), various medical conditions (48–93%) and BMI (from 27.2 [23.5–31.9] to 24.3 [22.1–27.0] kg/m2). Among a subset reporting current lipids, LDL-cholesterol was markedly elevated (172 mg/dL), whereas HDL-cholesterol (68 gm/dL) and triglycerides (68 mg/dL) were optimal. Participants with diabetes reported benefits including reductions in BMI (4.3 kg/m2, 1.4–7.2), HbA1C (0.4%, 0–1.7), and diabetes medication use (84–100%). Contrary to common expectations, adults consuming a carnivore diet experienced few adverse effects and instead reported health benefits and high satisfaction. Cardiovascular risk factors were variably affected. The generalizability of these findings and the long-term effects of this dietary pattern require further study. In a survey of over 2000 adults following a “carnivore diet” (i.e., one that aims to avoid plant foods), health benefits and satisfaction were generally reported.

Key Takeaways

This study was a survey of around 2000 people consuming a carnivore diet for around 14 months that consisted of mostly animal products and less than 10% of participants consumed plant based foods monthly. Less than 5% reported adverse symptoms , and 95% saw improvements in overall health and satisfaction. Other benefits noted were reduction in BMI, optimization of HDL and triglycerides, reduction in blood sugar, reduction in diabetes medication use, and increase in overall well being.

Carnivore Diet Improves Health and Well Being With

Dietary Intake of Red Meat, Processed Meat, and Poultry and Risk of Colorectal Cancer and All-Cause Mortality in the Context of Dietary Guideline Compliance

URL: https://www.mdpi.com/2072-6643/13/1/32

Journal: Nutrients

Publication Date: 12/2020

Summary: Meat intake has been linked to increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC) and mortality. However, diet composition may affect the risks. We aimed to estimate associations between red and processed meat and poultry intake and risk of CRC and all-cause mortality and if they are modified by dietary quality using Cox regression analyses. Baseline dietary data were obtained from three survey rounds of the Danish National Survey on Diet and Physical Activity. Data on CRC and all-cause mortality were extracted from national registers. The cohort was followed from date of survey interview—or for CRC, from age 50 years, whichever came last, until 31 December 2017. Meat intake was analysed categorically and continuously, and stratified by dietary quality for 15–75-year-old Danes at baseline, n 6282 for CRC and n 9848 for mortality analyses. We found no significant association between red and processed meat intake and CRC risk. For poultry, increased CRC risk for high versus low intake (HR 1.62; 95%CI 1.13–2.31) was found, but not when examining risk change per 100 g increased intake. We showed no association between meat intake and all-cause mortality. The association between meat intake and CRC or mortality risk was not modified by dietary quality.

Key Takeaways

There is no association between meat intake and all cause mortality. There is no association between red and processed meat consumption and colon cancer.

Red Meat Does NOT Increase Risk of Colon Cancer

Crohn’s disease successfully treated with the paleolithic ketogenic diet

URL: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/306373055_Crohn’s_disease_successfully_treated_with_the_paleolithic_ketogenic_diet

Journal: International Journal of Case Reports and Images
Publication Date: 09/2016
Summary: Here we report a severe case of Crohn’s disease where we successfully applied the paleolithic ketogenic diet. Dietary therapy resulted in resolution of symptoms, normalized laboratory parameters as well as gradual normalization of bowel inflammation as evidenced by imaging data and normalization of intestinal permeability as shown by the polyethylene glycol (PEG 400) challenge test. The patient was able to discontinue medication within two weeks. Currently, he is on the diet for 15 months and is free of symptoms as well as side effects.

Key Takeaways

Chron's disease is reversible with appropriate dietary intervention. This case utilized a paleo and ketogenic approach (nearly carnivore) to reverse Chron's and discontinue medication resulting in the patient being symptom free for 15 months.

Chron's Is Reversible With Appropriate Diet

A child with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) successfully treated with the Paleolithic ketogenic diet: A 19-month insulin freedom

URL: http://www.ijcasereportsandimages.com/archive/2015/012-2015-ijcri/CR-10582-12-2015-toth/ijcri-1058212201582-toth-full-text.php

Journal: International Journal of Case Reports and Images

Publication Date: 12/2015

Summary: A nine-year-old child with T1DM who initially was on an insulin regime with high carbohydrate diet then was put on the Paleolithic ketogenic diet. Following dietary shift glucose levels normalized and he was able to discontinue insulin. No hypoglycemic episodes occurred on the diet and several other benefits were achieved including improved physical fitness, reduction of upper respiratory tract infections and eczema. Currently, he is on the diet for 19 months.

Key Takeaways

A 9 year old child with Type 1 diabetes was able to get off insulin by implementing a paleolithic ketogenic diet. Additionally the child had improved fitness level, eczema, and reduced upper respiratory infections.

The Carnivore Diet Could Potentially Reverse Type 1 Diabetes if Caught Early

Halted Progression of Soft Palate Cancer in a Patient Treated with the Paleolithic Ketogenic Diet Alone: A 20-months Follow-up

URL: http://pubs.sciepub.com/ajmcr/4/8/8/

Journal: American Journal of Medical Case Reports

Publication Date: 08/2016

Summary: Here we present a case with myoepithelial tumor of the soft palate where the patient denied conventional treatment options. Instead, the patient started the paleolithic ketogenic diet which resulted in a halted progression of the tumor as evidenced by imaging follow-up. Currently, the patient is on the diet for 20 months, without symptoms and side effects.

Key Takeaways

A patient with cancer in the back of the upper mouth was able to halt progression of the cancer and become symptom free by denying standard care and implementing a paleolithic ketogenic diets.

Paleolithic Ketogenic Diet Stops Cancer Dead In Its Tracks

The ‘carnivore connection’ — evolutionary aspects of insulin resistance

URL: https://www.nature.com/articles/1601351

Journal: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Publication Date: 03/2002

Summary: Insulin resistance is common and is determined by physiological (aging, physical fitness), pathological (obesity) and genetic factors. The metabolic compensatory response to insulin resistance is hyperinsulinaemia, the primary purpose of which is to maintain normal glucose tolerance. The ‘carnivore connection’ postulates a critical role for the quantity of dietary protein and carbohydrate and the change in the glycaemic index of dietary carbohydrate in the evolution of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia. Insulin resistance offered survival and reproductive advantages during the Ice Ages which dominated human evolution, during which a high-protein low-carbohydrate diet was consumed. Following the end of the last Ice Age and the advent of agriculture, dietary carbohydrate increased. Although this resulted in a sharp increase in the quantity of carbohydrate consumed, these traditional carbohydrate foods had a low glycaemic index and produced only modest increases in plasma insulin. The industrial revolution changed the quality of dietary carbohydrate. The milling of cereals made starch more digestible and postprandial glycaemic and insulin responses increased 2–3 fold compared with coarsely ground flour or whole grains. This combination of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia is a common feature of many modern day diseases. Over the last 50 y the explosion of convenience and takeaway ‘fast foods’ has exposed most populations to caloric intakes far in excess of daily energy requirements and the resulting obesity has been a major factor in increasing the prevalence of insulin resistance.

Key Takeaways

Humans consumed a high protein low carbohydrate diet during the ice ages. Then, at the end of the last ice age carbohydrate intake increased with agriculture, but it wasn't until industrialization producing large quantities of refined carbohydrates did humans experience problems with insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia that results in modern day diseases.

Modern Day Diseases Are Caused By Deviation From Our Ancestral Diet

Glycation, ageing and carnosine: Are carnivorous diets beneficial?

URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0047637405001193

Journal: Mechanisms of Ageing and Development

Publication Date: 10/2005

Summary: The possible beneficial effects of carnosine and related structures on protein carbonyl stress, AGE formation, secondary diabetic complications and age-related neuropathology are discussed.

Key Takeaways

Carnosine is a nutrient found only in meat that has the benefit of reducing the harmful effects of sugar linking to proteins and disrupting their ability to function.

Nutrients Exclusive To Meat May Be Helpful For Diabetics.

The paradoxical nature of hunter-gatherer diets: meat-based, yet non-atherogenic

URL: https://www.nature.com/articles/1601353

Journal: European Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Publication Date: 03/2002

Summary: A review of the 20th century studies of hunter gatherer populations. HG consume approximately 65% of their calories from animal products. There is a low incidence of CVD in hunter gatherers

Key Takeaways

Hunter Gatherers consume a diet where 65% of their calories come from animal foods yet they have very low heart disease.

Why Aren't Hunter Gatherers Getting Heart Disease?

The carnivore connection: dietary carbohydrate in the evolution of NIDDM.

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7895958

Journal: Diabetologia.

Publication Date: 12/1994

Summary: We postulate a critical role for the quantity and quality of dietary carbohydrate in the pathogenesis of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM). Our primate ancestors ate a high-carbohydrate diet and the brain and reproductive tissues evolved a specific requirement for glucose as a source of fuel. But the Ice Ages which dominated the last two million years of human evolution brought a low-carbohydrate, high-protein diet. Certain metabolic adaptations were therefore necessary to accommodate the low glucose intake. Studies in both humans and experimental animals indicate that the adaptive (phenotypic) response to low-carbohydrate intake is insulin resistance. This provides the clue that insulin resistance is the mechanism for coping with a shortage of dietary glucose. We propose that the low-carbohydrate carnivorous diet would have disadvantaged reproduction in insulin-sensitive individuals and positively selected for individuals with insulin resistance. Natural selection would therefore result in a high proportion of people with genetically-determined insulin resistance. Other factors, such as geographic isolation, have contributed to further increases in the prevalence of the genotype in some population groups. Europeans may have a low incidence of diabetes because they were among the first to adopt agriculture and their diet has been high in carbohydrate for 10,000 years. The selection pressure for insulin resistance (i.e., a low-carbohydrate diet) was therefore relaxed much sooner in Caucasians than in other populations. Hence the prevalence of genes producing insulin resistance should be lower in the European population and any other group exposed to high-carbohydrate intake for a sufficiently long period of time.

Key Takeaways

Over the course of millions of years, the dietary patterns of humans and our ancestors have gone through some changes. Before the ice ages, it is likely that our ancestors ate a higher carbohydrate diet, but when the ice ages came along we were forced to eat a diet of mostly protein and fat. The ice ages lasted about two million years and therefore made it so individuals who could adapt to this high protein and fat diet were more likely to survive. But, after the ice ages humans began farming and returned to a higher carbohydrate diet. Populations that began farming earlier such as Europeans likely have adapted better to higher carbohydrate diets and are therefore less likely to become diabetic in the modern era.

Two Million Years Of Ice Ages Selected For Humans To Consume A High Protein and Fat Diet

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