Soy protein, phytate, and iron absorption in humans

Share This Post

URL: https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-abstract/56/3/573/4715420?redirectedFrom=fulltext

Journal: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Publication Date: 09/1992

Summary: The effect of reducing the phytate in soy-protein isolates on nonheme-iron absorption was examined in 32 human subjects. Iron absorption was measured by using an extrinsic radioiron label in liquid-formula meals containing hydrolyzed corn starch, corn oil, and either egg white or one of a series of soy-protein isolates with different phytate contents. Iron absorption increased four- to fivefold when phytic acid was reduced from its native amount of 4.9–8.4 to < 0.01 mg/g of isolate. Even relatively small quantities of residual phytate were strongly inhibitory and phytic acid had to be reduced to < 0.3 mg/g of isolate (corresponding to < 10 mg phytic acid/meal) before a meaningful increase in iron absorption was observed. However, even after removal of virtually all the phytic acid, iron absorption from the soy-protein meal was still only half that of the egg white control. It is concluded that phytic acid is a major inhibitory factor of iron absorption in soy-protein isolates but that other factors contribute to the poor bioavailability of iron from these products.

Key Takeaways

Phytates are anti-nutrients plants that bind minerals and prevent their absorption. This study confirms this by comparing iron absorption in soy-protein to iron absorption in soy-protein that has had its phytates reduced. There was a 4-5 fold increase in iron absorption with reduced phytates. Then iron absorption was between soy-protein with all phytates removed and egg whites. The egg whites still resulted in 2x the iron absorption capacity of soy-protein after phytate removal.

Don't Rely On The Label To Tell You The Mineral Content Of Plant Foods

Share This Post

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Get Fun Carnivore Updates and inspirations

More To Explore

Meat and mental health: A meta-analysis of meat consumption, depression, and anxiety

URL: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/10408398.2021.1974336 Journal: Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition Publication Date: 10/2021 Summary: In this meta-analysis, we examined the quantitative relation between meat consumption or avoidance, depression, and anxiety. in June 2020, we searched five online databases for primary studies examining differences in depression and anxiety between meat abstainers and meat consumers that offered a

Effect of Lower Versus Higher Red Meat Intake on Cardiometabolic and Cancer Outcomes: A Systematic Review of Randomized Trials

URL: https://annals.org/aim/fullarticle/2752326/effect-lower-versus-higher-red-meat-intake-cardiometabolic-cancer-outcomes Journal: Annals of Internal Medicine Publication Date: 10/2019 Summary: Low- to very-low-certainty evidence suggests that diets restricted in red meat may have little or no effect on major cardiometabolic outcomes and cancer mortality and incidence. Key Takeaways Restricting meat from the diet does not have positive effects on cardiometabolic disease or cancer mortality and incidence. There are

Do You Want To Achieve your Optimal Health?

Join us for a free 30-date trial. Cancel Anytime.