Sleep Deprivation and Oxidative Stress in Animal Models: A Systematic Review

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URL: https://www.hindawi.com/journals/omcl/2015/234952/
Journal: Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Publication Date: 04/2015
Summary: Because the function and mechanisms of sleep are partially clear, here we applied a meta-analysis to address the issue whether sleep function includes antioxidative properties in mice and rats. Given the expansion of the knowledge in the sleep field, it is indeed ambitious to describe all mammals, or other animals, in which sleep shows an antioxidant function. However, in this paper we reviewed the current understanding from basic studies in two species to drive the hypothesis that sleep is a dynamic-resting state with antioxidative properties. We performed a systematic review of articles cited in Medline, Scopus, and Web of Science until March 2015 using the following search terms: Sleep or sleep deprivation and oxidative stress, lipid peroxidation, glutathione, nitric oxide, catalase or superoxide dismutase. We found a total of 266 studies. After inclusion and exclusion criteria, 44 articles were included, which are presented and discussed in this study. The complex relationship between sleep duration and oxidative stress is discussed. Further studies should consider molecular and genetic approaches to determine whether disrupted sleep promotes oxidative stress.

Key Takeaways

Sleep deprivation promotes oxidative stress, however this review suggests that sleep deprivation is correlated with an increase in production of antioxidants as a protective mechanism. While the body may have a built in protective mechanism for sleep deprivation, one should be weary of the effects of chronic sleep deprivation.

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