Prolonged Meat Diets with a Study of Kidney Function and Ketosis

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URL: http://www.jbc.org/content/87/3/651.full.pdf

Journal: Journal of Biological Chemistry

Publication Date: 02/1930

Summary: This publication reviews the metabolic effects of consuming a diet of only meat for 1 year.  Dr. Vilhjalmur Stefansson spent over 11 years in arctic exploration, during 9 years of which he lived almost exclusively on meat. Stimulated by this experience, Stefansson and Andersen, the latter a member of one of the expeditions, voluntarily agreed to eat nothing but meat for 1 year while they continued their usual activities in the temperate climate of New York.

Key Takeaways 

Two men ate an all meat diet for 1 year. They had no adverse health effects. They lost weight. One had decreased blood pressure and the other's remained constant. Their urine was more acidic due to excretion of acetone produced from ketosis, and there was no negative effects in the kidneys.

Two Men Did A Carnivore Diet In 1930, What Happened?

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