Improvements in Glucose Metabolism and Insulin Sensitivity with a Low-Carbohydrate Diet in Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

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URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24015695

Journal: Journal of the American College of Nutrition

Publication Date: 04/2013

Summary: The optimal diet for weight loss in type 2 diabetes remains controversial. This study examined a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet with detailed physiological assessments of insulin sensitivity, glycemic control, and risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Fourteen obese patients (body mass index [BMI] 40.6 ± 4.9 kg/m2) with type 2 diabetes were recruited for an “Atkins”-type low-carbohydrate diet. Measurements were made at 0, 12, and 24 weeks of weight, insulin sensitivity, HbA1c, lipids, and blood pressure. Twelve completers lost a mean of 9.7 ± 1.8 kg over 24 weeks attributable to a major reduction in carbohydrates and resultant reduction in total energy intake. Glycemic control significantly improved (HbA1c −1.1 ± 0.25%) with reductions in hypoglycemic medication. Fasting glucose, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), and area under the curve (AUC) glucose (intravenous glucose tolerance test [IVGTT]) were significantly reduced by week 12 (p < 0.05). There were nonsignificant improvements in insulin sensitivity (SI) at week 12 ( p = 0.19) and week 24 ( p = 0.31). Systolic blood pressure was reduced (mean −10.0 mmHg between weeks 0 and 24, p = 0.13). Mean high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and total cholesterol all increased. The ratio of total: HDL cholesterol and triglycerides was reduced. A low-carbohydrate diet was well tolerated and achieved weight loss over 24 weeks in subjects with diabetes. Glycemic control improved with a reduction in requirements for hypoglycemic agents.

Key Takeaways

In this study, a low carbohydrate diet was administered to 14 obese type 2 diabetics for 24 weeks. The subjects saw improvements across the board in weight, blood sugar, and blood pressure. Total, HDL, and LDL cholesterol all increased, but with good ratios. Overall glycemic control was improved with a lower requirement for diabetic medications.

Ketogenic Diets Improve Glycemic Control and Reduce Medication Requirement in Type 2 Diabetics

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