Eating meat makes you sexy: Conformity to dietary gender norms and attractiveness.

Share This Post

URL: https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2017-26154-001

Journal: Psychology of Men & Masculinity

Publication Date: 07/2018

Summary: Past research has highlighted links between meat consumption and masculine gender role norms such that meat consumers are generally attributed more masculine traits than their vegetable-consuming counterparts. However, the direct link between gender roles and men’s food choices has been somewhat neglected in the literature. Three studies conducted in Italy investigated this link between meat and masculinity. Studies 1 and 2 analyzed female mating preference for vegetarian and omnivorous partners, confirming that women preferred omnivorous men (Study 1 and 2), rated them as more attractive (Study 1 and 2), and felt more positive about them (Study 1) than vegetarians. Moreover Study 2 showed that the attribution of masculinity mediated this relationship, such that vegetarian men were considered less attractive because they were perceived as less masculine. Study 3 tested the relationship between the endorsement of food-related gender norms and food choices in a sample of Italian men. The results showed that men who perceived vegetarianism as feminine preferred meat-based dishes for themselves and expected their female partners to choose vegetarian dishes. Together, these findings show that gender role norms prescribing that men eat meat are actively maintained by both women and men and do in fact guide men’s food choices.

Key Takeaways

Females rated men who ate meat as more attractive than those who didn't eat meat. These women considered the vegetarian men as less masculine, and therefore less attractive. Men also perceived vegetarian eating as feminine. This study implies that increased meat eating is associated with masculine gender roles.

Share This Post

Subscribe To Our Newsletter

Get Fun Carnivore Updates and inspirations

More To Explore

Effects of weight loss during a very low carbohydrate diet on specific adipose tissue depots and insulin sensitivity in older adults with obesity: a randomized clinical trial

URL: https://nutritionandmetabolism.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12986-020-00481-9Journal: Nutrition & MetabolismPublication Date: 08/2020Summary: Weight loss resulting from consumption of a diet lower in CHO and higher in fat may be beneficial for older adults with obesity by depleting adipose tissue depots most strongly implicated in poor metabolic and functional outcomes and by improving insulin sensitivity and the lipid profile. Key Takeaways Older adults

Ketogenic Diet and Health

URL: https://www.lidsen.com/journals/icm/icm-06-02-015Journal: OBM Integrative and Complementary MedicinePublication Date: 04/2021Summary: Carbohydrate-restricted ketogenic diets (KD) were introduced in the mid-19th century as a weight loss method with a resurgence of its use in epilepsy treatment in the 1920’s. Research conducted over the last several years provides evidence that KD’s can confer beneficial effects for several chronic metabolic

Do You Want To Achieve your Optimal Health?

Join us for a free 30-date trial. Cancel Anytime.