Dietary protein, calcium metabolism, and skeletal homeostasis revisited

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URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/12936953/

Journal: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Publication Date: 09/2003

Summary: Dietary protein intakes at and below 0.8 g/kg were associated with a probable reduction in intestinal calcium absorption sufficient to cause secondary hyperparathyroidism. The long-term consequences of these low-protein diet–induced changes in mineral metabolism are not known, but the diet could be detrimental to skeletal health. Of concern are several recent epidemiologic studies that demonstrate reduced bone density and increased rates of bone loss in individuals habitually consuming low-protein diets. Studies are needed to determine whether low protein intakes directly affect rates of bone resorption, bone formation, or both.

Key Takeaways

Protein intake less than .8g/kg led to decreased ability. for the intestine to absorb calcium. This decreased absorption was enough to stimulate the calcium sensing hormone parathyroid hormone. Parathyroid hormone acts to increase calcium levels by multiple mechanisms, but one of these is the leeching of stored calcium in the bones. Low protein diets may be associated with poor bone health due to loss of calcium.

Could Low Protein Diets Cause Demineralization of Your Bones?

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