Immunity & Inflammation

Peer-Reviewed Scientific Articles​

Very low-calorie ketogenic diet may allow restoring response to systemic therapy in relapsing plaque psoriasis.

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26559897

Journal: Obesity Research & Clinical Practice

Publication Date: 05/2016

Summary: Psoriasis is a chronic disease associated with overweight/obesity and related cardiometabolic complications. The link between these diseases is likely the inflammatory background associated with adipose tissue, particularly the visceral one. Accordingly, previous studies have demonstrated that in the long-term weight loss may improve the response to systemic therapies. We report a case report of a woman in her 40s suffering from relapsing moderate-to-severe plaque psoriasis and obesity-related metabolic syndrome, in whom adequate response to ongoing treatment with biological therapy (adalimumab) was restored after only 4 weeks of very low-calorie, carbohydrate-free (ketogenic), protein-based diet. Accordingly, through rapid and consistent weight loss, very low calorie ketogenic diet may allow restoring a quick response to systemic therapy in a patient suffering from relapsing psoriasis. This intervention should be considered in overweight/obese patients before the rearrangement of systemic therapy. Nonetheless, studies are required to evaluate whether very low calorie ketogenic diets should be preferred to common low-calorie diets to improve the response to systemic therapy at least in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis.

Key Takeaways

This case report suggest that a low calorie ketogenic diet that accelerates weight loss can restore the ability of the body to respond to therapy with adalimumab in someone with relapsing plaque psoriasis.

Psoriasis Treatment No Longer Working? Try a Ketogenic Diet

The Effect of Low-Carbohydrate and Low-Fat Diets on Pain in Individuals with Knee Osteoarthritis

URL: https://academic.oup.com/painmedicine/article-abstract/21/1/150/5380130?redirectedFrom=fulltext

Journal: Pain Medicine

Publication Date: 01/2020

Summary: Osteoarthritis is the most prominent form of arthritis, affecting approximately 15% of the population in the United States. Knee osteoarthritis (KOA) has become one of the leading causes of disability in older adults. Besides knee replacement, there are no curative treatments for KOA, so persistent pain is commonly treated with opioids, acetaminophen, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. However, these drugs have many unpleasant side effects, so there is a need for alternative forms of pain management. We sought to test the efficacy of a dietary intervention to reduce KOA. A randomized controlled pilot study to test the efficacy of two dietary interventions. Subjects. Adults 65–75 years of age with KOA. Participants were asked to follow one of two dietary interventions (low-carbohydrate [LCD], low-fat [LFD]) or continue to eat as usual (control [CTRL]) over 12 weeks. Functional pain, self-reported pain, quality of life, and depression were assessed every three weeks. Serum from before and after the diet intervention was analyzed for oxidative stress. Over a period of 12 weeks, the LCD reduced pain intensity and unpleasantness in some functional pain tasks, as well as self-reported pain, compared with the LFD and CTRL. The LCD also significantly reduced oxidative stress and the adipokine leptin compared with the LFD and CTRL. Reduction in oxidative stress was related to reduced functional pain. We present evidence suggesting that oxidative stress may be related to functional pain, and lowering it through our LCD intervention could provide relief from pain and be an opioid alternative.

Key Takeaways

A low carbohydrate diet may be an alternative to pain medication in those with osteoarthritis. The low carb diet was shown to reduce oxidative stress, functional pain, and self reported pain by the individuals in this study.

Drop The Pain Pills, Eat a Low Carb Diet to Reduce Arthritis Pain

Important roles of dietary taurine, creatine, carnosine, anserine and 4-hydroxyproline in human nutrition and health

URL: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00726-020-02823-6

Journal: Amino Acids

Publication Date: 2/2020

Summary: Taurine (a sulfur-containing β-amino acid), creatine (a metabolite of arginine, glycine and methionine), carnosine (a dipeptide; β-alanyl-L-histidine), and 4-hydroxyproline (an imino acid; also often referred to as an amino acid) were discovered in cattle, and the discovery of anserine (a methylated product of carnosine; β-alanyl-1-methyl-L-histidine) also originated with cattle. These five nutrients are highly abundant in beef, and have important physiological roles in anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory reactions, as well as neurological, muscular, retinal, immunological and cardiovascular function. Of particular note, taurine, carnosine, anserine, and creatine are absent from plants, and hydroxyproline is negligible in many plant-source foods. Consumption of 30 g dry beef can fully meet daily physiological needs of the healthy 70-kg adult human for taurine and carnosine, and can also provide large amounts of creatine, anserine and 4-hydroxyproline to improve human nutrition and health, including metabolic, retinal, immunological, muscular, cartilage, neurological, and cardiovascular health. The present review provides the public with the much-needed knowledge of nutritionally and physiologically significant amino acids, dipeptides and creatine in animal-source foods (including beef). Dietary taurine, creatine, carnosine, anserine and 4-hydroxyproline are beneficial for preventing and treating obesity, cardiovascular dysfunction, and ageing-related disorders, as well as inhibiting tumorigenesis, improving skin and bone health, ameliorating neurological abnormalities, and promoting well being in infants, children and adults. Furthermore, these nutrients may promote the immunological defense of humans against infections by bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses (including coronavirus) through enhancing the metabolism and functions of monocytes, macrophages, and other cells of the immune system. Red meat (including beef) is a functional food for optimizing human growth, development and health.

Key Takeaways

Taurine, Creatine, Carnosine, 4-hydroxyproline, and Anserine are amino acids discovered in beef and not available from plant based nutrition. These nutriets provide important anti-inflammatory, anti-aging, anti-cancer, and anti-obesity effects. These nutrients also have many positive effects on cardiovascular, metabolic, and neurologic health.

Red Meat Is A Health Food

Paleolithic ketogenic diet (PKD) in chronic diseases: Clinical and research data

URL: https://jevohealth.com/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1115&context=journal

Journal: Journal of Evolution and Health

Publication Date: 03/2019

Summary: In the presentation we give an overview of our clinical experience and research with the paleolithic ketogenic diet (PKD), a diet that was developed by the ICMNI team. Since 2012 we have been exclusively using this approach in the treatment of a wide array of chronic conditions. We use the combined term u201dpaleolithic ketogenicu201d because the diet has its roots in both, the paleolithic and the ketogenic diet. The PKD combines the benefits of the two diets while excluding shortcomings of both diets. We have to emphasise the fact that both the classic version of the ketogenic diet and the popular version of the paleolithic diet are associated with side-effects. The side-effects of the classic ketogenic diet have been well documented through its use over the last hundred years, whereas, the shortcomings of the popular paleolithic diet are less well-known. As examples for the side-effects, we present a patient who, after 7 years on the popular paleolithic diet, developed severe atherosclerosis, and another patient who, after following the classic ketogenic diet for 17 years, developed tophi (deposition of urate crystals in soft tissues) in multiple locations on hands and feet. Since 2012 we have been using the PKD on more than 4000 patients including those with autoimmune diseases, cancer, psychiatric and neurologic conditions. In the presentation we focus on presenting data on type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and cancer patients, as well as showing research data related to intestinal permeability measurements in healthy persons as well as in patients.

Key Takeaways

Combining the Paleo diet with a Ketogenic diet is effective at relieving the pitfalls that each diet has. This combined diet shows to have positive effects on autoimmune conditions, cancer, and psychological and neurologic conditions.

A Carnivore Diet Outperforms Both Paleo and Keto Diets

Effects of Total Red Meat Consumption on Glycemic Control and Inflammation: A Systematically Searched Meta-analysis and Meta-regression of Randomized Controlled Trials (OR22-08-19)

URL: https://academic.oup.com/cdn/article/3/Supplement_1/nzz028.OR22-08-19/5516820

Journal: Current Developments in Nutrition

Publication Date: 06/2019

Summary: Consuming ≥ vs <0.5 servings/d of red meat showed greater decreases in insulin when carbohydrates were replaced with red meat but lesser decreases in HOMA-IR when macronutrient distributions were matched between intervention and control eating patterns.

Key Takeaways

In individuals with cardiometabolic disease, replacing carbohydrate calories with red meat showed greater reduction in insulin.

Replace Carbs with Red Meat To Drive Insulin Down

Protein-enriched diet, with the use of lean red meat, combined with progressive resistance training enhances lean tissue mass and muscle strength and reduces circulating IL-6 concentrations in elderly women: a cluster randomized controlled trial

URLhttps://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/99/4/899/4637870

Journal: The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Publication Date: 04/2014

Summary: 100 elderly women were randomized to a high protein diet supplemented with lean red meat combined with progressive resistance training versus progressive resistance training with a control diet. Lean tissue mass and strenghth increased more in the meat supplemented group. IGF-1 increase more and IL-6 decreased more in the meat supplemented group

Key Takeaways

High protein red meat containing diets lead to better strength, more lean mass, increased growth factors, and decreased inflammatory markers compared to a control diet in elderly women doing resistance training.

Losing Muscle as You Age? Try Eating Some Steak!

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