Diabetes

Peer-Reviewed Scientific Articles​

Ketogenic Diet and Health

URL: https://www.lidsen.com/journals/icm/icm-06-02-015
Journal: OBM Integrative and Complementary Medicine
Publication Date: 04/2021
Summary: Carbohydrate-restricted ketogenic diets (KD) were introduced in the mid-19th century as a weight loss method with a resurgence of its use in epilepsy treatment in the 1920’s. Research conducted over the last several years provides evidence that KD’s can confer beneficial effects for several chronic metabolic diseases, including obesity, type-2 diabetes, and polycystic ovary syndrome. In recent years, emerging evidence suggests KD’s may also have therapeutic benefits for some cancers and for neurological conditions such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s’ disease, multiple sclerosis, traumatic brain injury, and spinal cord injury. Finally, as the physiological mechanisms by which a KD operates become increasingly understood, we speculate that several other health conditions (e.g., autism, cystic fibrosis, COVID-19) that may improve from consuming a KD. The potential to reduce or eliminate long-term pharmaceutical treatments and their potential adverse effects by modifying diet patterns justifies additional research, particularly rigorously conducted clinical trials with long-term follow-up. This brief review describes a selection of the recent studies of KD as applied to chronic metabolic diseases, and provides an estimate of the quality of the evidence for KD’s effects. We also describe and appraise some of the risks and misconceptions attributed to KD which may limit the widespread use of KD’s among physicians and healthcare providers.

Key Takeaways

Since the introduction of the ketogenic diet in the 1920's as a treatment for epilepsy, the diet has proven to show many metabolic benefits that prove useful in the treatment of diseases such as type 2 diabetes, PCOS, obesity, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, multiple sclerosis, and brain/spinal injuries. This dietary pattern is being studied more and more, and the fact that this dietary treatment can reduce or prevent the use of pharmaceutical medication warrants more rigorous studies. In addition, this dietary pattern may prove useful for other health conditions as well from autism to COVID-19. The ketogenic diet may be pivotal in the future of medicine.

Beyond Epilepsy: The Ketogenic Diet Has A Bright Future in Medicine

Ultra-processed food and risk of type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal studies

URL: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/34904160/
Journal: International Journal of Epidemiology
Publication Date: 08/2022
Summary: In total 2272 records were screened, of which 18 studies, including almost 1.1 million individuals, were included in this review and 72% showed a positive association between ultra-processed foods and the risk of diabetes. According to the studies included in the meta-analysis, compared with non-consumption, moderate intake of ultra-processed food increased the risk of diabetes by 12% [relative risk (RR): 1.12; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06-1.17, I2 = 24%], whereas high intake increased risk by 31% (RR: 1.31; 95% CI: 1.21-1.42, I2 = 60%).

Key Takeaways

Even moderate consumption of Ultra-processed food can increase your risk of diabetes by 12%, and high ultra processed food intake can increase it by 31%.

Is Ultra-Processed Food to Blame for The Diabetes Epidemic

Effect of a 90 g/day low-carbohydrate diet on glycaemic control, small, dense low-density lipoprotein and carotid intima-media thickness in type 2 diabetic patients: An 18-month randomised controlled trial

URL: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33017456/

Journal: PLoS One

Publication Date: 10/2020

Summary: This study explored the effect of a moderate (90 g/d) low-carbohydrate diet (LCD) in type 2 diabetes patients over 18 months. Ninety-two poorly controlled type 2 diabetes patients aged 20-80 years with HbA1c ≥7.5% (58 mmol/mol) in the previous three months were randomly assigned to a 90 g/d LCD or a traditional diabetic diet (TDD). The primary outcomes were glycaemic control status and change in medication effect score (MES). The secondary outcomes were lipid profiles, small, dense low-density lipoprotein (sdLDL), serum creatinine, microalbuminuria and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). A total of 85 (92.4%) patients completed 18 months of the trial. At the end of the study, the LCD and TDD group consumed 88.0±29.9 g and 151.1±29.8 g of carbohydrates, respectively (p < 0.05). The 18-month mean change from baseline was statistically significant for the HbA1c (-1.6±0.3 vs. -1.0±0.3%), 2-h glucose (-94.4±20.8 vs. -18.7±25.7 mg/dl), MES (-0.42±0.32 vs. -0.05±0.24), weight (-2.8±1.8 vs. -0.7±0.7 kg), waist circumference (-5.7±2.7 vs. -1.9±1.4 cm), hip circumference (-6.1±1.8 vs. -2.9±1.7 cm) and blood pressure (-8.3±4.6/-5.0±3 vs. 1.6±0.5/2.5±1.6 mmHg) between the LCD and TDD groups (p<0.05). The 18-month mean change from baseline was not significantly different in lipid profiles, sdLDL, serum creatinine, microalbuminuria, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and carotid IMT between the groups. A moderate (90 g/d) LCD showed better glycaemic control with decreasing MES, lowering blood pressure, decreasing weight, waist and hip circumference without adverse effects on lipid profiles, sdLDL, serum creatinine, microalbuminuria, ALT and carotid IMT than TDD for type 2 diabetic patients.

Key Takeaways

Low carbohydrate diets offer better blood sugar control, weight loss, waist and hip circumference reduction, and blood pressure reduction than traditional diabetic diets consisting of 50-60% carbohydrates and less than 30% fat.

Low Carbohydrate Diets Are Superior To Diets Recommended to Diabetics

The effect of a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet versus a low-glycemic index diet on glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2633336/

Journal: Nutrition and Metabolism

Publication Date: 12/2008

Summary: Dietary carbohydrate is the major determinant of postprandial glucose levels, and several clinical studies have shown that low-carbohydrate diets improve glycemic control. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a diet lower in carbohydrate would lead to greater improvement in glycemic control over a 24-week period in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Eighty-four community volunteers with obesity and type 2 diabetes were randomized to either a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet (<20 g of carbohydrate daily; LCKD) or a low-glycemic, reduced-calorie diet (500 kcal/day deficit from weight maintenance diet; LGID). Both groups received group meetings, nutritional supplementation, and an exercise recommendation. The main outcome was glycemic control, measured by hemoglobin A1c. Forty-nine (58.3%) participants completed the study. Both interventions led to improvements in hemoglobin A1c, fasting glucose, fasting insulin, and weight loss. The LCKD group had greater improvements in hemoglobin A1c (-1.5% vs. -0.5%, p = 0.03), body weight (-11.1 kg vs. -6.9 kg, p = 0.008), and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (+5.6 mg/dL vs. 0 mg/dL, p < 0.001) compared to the LGID group. Diabetes medications were reduced or eliminated in 95.2% of LCKD vs. 62% of LGID participants (p < 0.01). Dietary modification led to improvements in glycemic control and medication reduction/elimination in motivated volunteers with type 2 diabetes. The diet lower in carbohydrate led to greater improvements in glycemic control, and more frequent medication reduction/elimination than the low glycemic index diet. Lifestyle modification using low carbohydrate interventions is effective for improving and reversing type 2 diabetes.

Key Takeaways

Both low carbohydrate ketogenic diets and calorie restriction diets lead to better blood sugar control and weight loss, but low carbohydrate diets showed better improvements in blood sugar, HDL cholesterol, and diabetic medication reduction than calorie restrictive diets.

Low Carb Ketogenic Diets Outperform Calorie Restriction

Carbohydrate restriction as the default treatment for type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome

URL: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14017430802014838?journalCode=icdv20

Journal: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal

Publication Date: 02/2008

Summary: Dietary carbohydrate restriction in the treatment of diabetes and metabolic syndrome is based on an underlying principle of control of insulin secretion and the theory that insulin resistance is a response to chronic hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia. As such, the theory is intuitive and has substantial experimental support. It has generally been opposed by health agencies because of concern that carbohydrate will be replaced by fat, particularly saturated fat, thereby increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease as dictated by the so-called diet-heart hypothesis. Here we summarize recent data showing that, in fact, substitution of fat for carbohydrate generally improves cardiovascular risk factors. Removing the barrier of concern about dietary fat makes carbohydrate restriction a reasonable, if not the preferred method for treating type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome. We emphasize the ability of low carbohydrate diets to improve glycemic control, hemoglobin A1C and to reduce medication. We review evidence that such diets are effective even in the absence of weight loss.

Key Takeaways

Substitution of carbohydrates for fat, even saturated fat, in the diet improves cardiovascular risk factors, and thus this study suggests that carbohydrate restriction may be the preferred treatment for type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome since cardiovascular concerns have been alleviated.

Low Carb Diets Are Not A Risk To Cardiovascular Health

Effect of low-calorie versus low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet in type 2 diabetes

URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0899900712000731?via%3Dihub

Journal: Nutrition

Publication Date: 10/2012

Summary: Effective diabetic management requires reasonable weight control. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown the beneficial effects of a low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (LCKD) in patients with type 2 diabetes after its long term administration. Furthermore, it favorably alters the cardiac risk factors even in hyperlipidemic obese subjects. These studies have indicated that, in addition to decreasing body weight and improving glycemia, LCKD can be effective in decreasing antidiabetic medication dosage. Similar to the LCKD, the conventional low-calorie, high nutritional value diet is also used for weight loss. The purpose of this study was to understand the beneficial effects of LCKD compared with the low-calorie diet (LCD) in improving glycemia. Three hundred and sixty-three overweight and obese participants were recruited from the Al-Shaab Clinic for a 24-wk diet intervention trial; 102 of them had type 2 diabetes. The participants were advised to choose LCD or LDKD, depending on their preference. Body weight, body mass index, changes in waist circumference, blood glucose level, changes in hemoglobin and glycosylated hemoglobin, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, triglycerides, uric acid, urea and creatinine were determined before and at 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 wk after the administration of the LCD or LCKD. The initial dose of some antidiabetic medications was decreased to half and some were discontinued at the beginning of the dietary program in the LCKD group. Dietary counseling and further medication adjustment were done on a biweekly basis. The LCD and LCKD had beneficial effects on all the parameters examined. Interestingly, these changes were more significant in subjects who were on the LCKD as compared with those on the LCD. Changes in the level of creatinine were not statistically significant. This study shows the beneficial effects of a ketogenic diet over the conventional LCD in obese diabetic subjects. The ketogenic diet appears to improve glycemic control. Therefore, diabetic patients on a ketogenic diet should be under strict medical supervision because the LCKD can significantly lower blood glucose levels.

Key Takeaways

363 overweigh or obese patients (102 of them had type 2 diabetes) chose either a low carbohydrate ketogenic diet or a low calorie diet. The study lasted for 24 weeks, and both diets showed improvement in body weight, BMI, waist circumference, Hb-A1C, blood lipids, and kidney function tests. However, the low carb ketogenic group showed greater improvements across the board.

Ketogenic Diet Outperforms Calorie Restriction for Weight Loss and Diabetes Management

Improvements in Glucose Metabolism and Insulin Sensitivity with a Low-Carbohydrate Diet in Obese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24015695

Journal: Journal of the American College of Nutrition

Publication Date: 04/2013

Summary: The optimal diet for weight loss in type 2 diabetes remains controversial. This study examined a low-carbohydrate, high-fat diet with detailed physiological assessments of insulin sensitivity, glycemic control, and risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Fourteen obese patients (body mass index [BMI] 40.6 ± 4.9 kg/m2) with type 2 diabetes were recruited for an “Atkins”-type low-carbohydrate diet. Measurements were made at 0, 12, and 24 weeks of weight, insulin sensitivity, HbA1c, lipids, and blood pressure. Twelve completers lost a mean of 9.7 ± 1.8 kg over 24 weeks attributable to a major reduction in carbohydrates and resultant reduction in total energy intake. Glycemic control significantly improved (HbA1c −1.1 ± 0.25%) with reductions in hypoglycemic medication. Fasting glucose, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA), and area under the curve (AUC) glucose (intravenous glucose tolerance test [IVGTT]) were significantly reduced by week 12 (p < 0.05). There were nonsignificant improvements in insulin sensitivity (SI) at week 12 ( p = 0.19) and week 24 ( p = 0.31). Systolic blood pressure was reduced (mean −10.0 mmHg between weeks 0 and 24, p = 0.13). Mean high-density lipoprotein (HDL), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and total cholesterol all increased. The ratio of total: HDL cholesterol and triglycerides was reduced. A low-carbohydrate diet was well tolerated and achieved weight loss over 24 weeks in subjects with diabetes. Glycemic control improved with a reduction in requirements for hypoglycemic agents.

Key Takeaways

In this study, a low carbohydrate diet was administered to 14 obese type 2 diabetics for 24 weeks. The subjects saw improvements across the board in weight, blood sugar, and blood pressure. Total, HDL, and LDL cholesterol all increased, but with good ratios. Overall glycemic control was improved with a lower requirement for diabetic medications.

Ketogenic Diets Improve Glycemic Control and Reduce Medication Requirement in Type 2 Diabetics

Dietary carbohydrate restriction as the first approach in diabetes management: Critical review and evidence base

URL: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0899900714003323?via%3Dihub

Journal: Nutrition

Publication Date: 01/2015

Summary: The inability of current recommendations to control the epidemic of diabetes, the specific failure of the prevailing low-fat diets to improve obesity, cardiovascular risk, or general health and the persistent reports of some serious side effects of commonly prescribed diabetic medications, in combination with the continued success of low-carbohydrate diets in the treatment of diabetes and metabolic syndrome without significant side effects, point to the need for a reappraisal of dietary guidelines. The benefits of carbohydrate restriction in diabetes are immediate and well documented. Concerns about the efficacy and safety are long term and conjectural rather than data driven. Dietary carbohydrate restriction reliably reduces high blood glucose, does not require weight loss (although is still best for weight loss), and leads to the reduction or elimination of medication. It has never shown side effects comparable with those seen in many drugs. Here we present 12 points of evidence supporting the use of low-carbohydrate diets as the first approach to treating type 2 diabetes and as the most effective adjunct to pharmacology in type 1. They represent the best-documented, least controversial results. The insistence on long-term randomized controlled trials as the only kind of data that will be accepted is without precedent in science. The seriousness of diabetes requires that we evaluate all of the evidence that is available. The 12 points are sufficiently compelling that we feel that the burden of proof rests with those who are opposed.

Key Takeaways

The diabetes epidemic is progressing uncontrolled by current medical and dietary management. Low-Carbohydrate ketogenic diets show significant improvement in the disease better than any recommendation currently on the table. With effective reduction in blood sugar, weight loss, and medication reduction, this should be the primary recommendation by physicians in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

Why are Ketogenic Diets Not The First Line Recommendation for Diabetes?

Implementing a low carbohydrate, ketogenic diet to manage type 2 diabetes mellitus

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30289048

Journal: Expert Review of Endocrinology and Metabolism

Publication Date: 09/2018

Summary: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has reached epidemic proportions in the modern world. For individuals affected by obesity-related T2DM, clinical studies have shown that carbohydrate restriction and weight loss can improve hyperglycemia, obesity and T2DM. Reducing carbohydrate intake to a certain level, typically below 50 grams per day, leads to increased ketogenesis in order to provide fuel for the body. Such low- carbohydrate, ketogenic diets were employed to treat obesity and diabetes in the 19th and early 20th centuries. Recent clinical research has reinvigorated the use of the ketogenic diet for individuals with obesity and diabetes. Although characterized by chronic hyperglycemia, the underlying cause of T2DM is hyperinsulinemia and insulin resistance, typically as a result of increased energy intake leading to obesity. The ketogenic diet substantially reduces the glycemic response that results from dietary carbohydrate as well as improves the underlying insulin resistance. This review combines a literature search of the published science and practical guidance based on clinical experience. While the current treatment of T2DM emphasizes drug treatment and a higher carbohydrate diet, the ketogenic diet is an effective alternative that relies less on medication, and may even be a preferable option when medications are not available.

Key Takeaways

The ketogenic diet was used in the 1800s and early 1900s to treat obesity and diabetes, but today pharmaceutical therapy is standard of care. Type 2 diabetes is extremely common today, and medical therapy is not slowing the progression of the disease. Return to use of dietary approaches such as the ketogenic diet are more effective at reducing blood sugar and improving insulin resistance.

When Pharmaceuticals Can't Control The Diabetes Epidemic We Have To Try Something Else

Effectiveness and Safety of a Novel Care Model for the Management of Type 2 Diabetes at 1 Year: An Open-Label, Non-Randomized, Controlled Study

URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6104272/

Journal: Diabetes Therapy

Publication Date: 02/2018

Summary: Treatments for type 2 diabetes (T2D) have improved, yet T2D and being overweight are still significant public health concerns. Blood sugar in patients with T2D can improve quickly when patients eat significantly fewer dietary carbohydrates. However, this demands careful medicine management by doctors, and patients need support and frequent contact with health providers to sustain this way of living. The purpose of this study was to evaluate if a new care model with very low dietary carbohydrate intake and continuous supervision by a health coach and doctor could safely lower HbA1c, weight and need for medicines after 1 year in adults with T2D. 262 adults with T2D volunteered to participate in this continuous care intervention (CCI) along with 87 adults with T2D receiving usual care (UC) from their doctors and diabetes education program. After 1 year, patients in the CCI, on average, lowered HbA1c from 7.6 to 6.3%, lost 12% of their body weight, and reduced diabetes medicine use. 94% of patients who were prescribed insulin reduced or stopped their insulin use, and sulfonylureas were eliminated in all patients. Participants in the UC group had no changes to HbA1c, weight or diabetes medicine use over the year. These changes in CCI participants happened safely while dyslipidemia and markers of inflammation and liver function improved. This suggests the novel care model studied here using dietary carbohydrate restriction and continuous remote care can safely support adults with T2D to lower HbA1c, weight, and medicine use.

Key Takeaways

Type 2 diabetics who utilized a low carbohydrate diet with supervision from a health coach were able to effectively lose 12% of body weight, reduce HbA1C by an average of 1.3%, and reduce their diabetic medication use.

Low Carb Diets Put Diabetes In Remission

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