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How You Can Live a Better Life Through Eating the Carnivore Diet!

So you want to know how to improve your life through a carnivore diet? I’m thrilled to share with you the fantastic facts that I’m learning.

What is the Carnivore Diet?

If you’ve never heard of the carnivore diet, it is simply a diet of animal-based foods, rather than foods from the plant kingdom. If it came from an animal, you can have it, if it didn’t, you can’t have it.

Animal-derived foods are included as well, such as beef or chicken broth, caviar, butter, and cheese. Milk is not usually consumed on carnivore, however.

Some people find they do better without cheese. It may slow down weight loss, or cause congestion. If it does, just eliminate it.

Seafood and shellfish can be on your diet too. I have found that I want less of these as I progress on carnivore. At this writing, I am over a month into it. And I love it! More on that below.

What Are the Benefits of the Carnivore Diet?

Weight loss is probably the number one reason people come to the carnivore diet. For those who have a ‘broken metabolism’ and struggle to lose weight on low carb, or keto diets, carnivore is a godsend. I found that my cravings for carbs or just extra food (like a handful of nuts) stayed alive unless I dipped below 10 grams of carbs per day.

After living on that level for a few weeks, I realized that I was almost at carnivore anyway! I decided to take the plunge and see for myself if it was as miraculous as they say.

I think this the very best way to get on the carnivore diet. By cutting down to Very Low Keto, or Ketovore first, you’ll find it very easy to make the switch to zero carbs – it will be a piece of cake. (Sorry!)

Well, this is where I say it is easier to list the non-benefits of the carnivore diet because the benefits list is a mile long! We could literally be here all day, so I’ll just include some of the major ones.

Here are a few of the improvements patients have reported:

I’d like to mention just a few more:

Thyroid problems vanish, ADHD subsides, and both children and adults become calm and focused. Children should be slowly weaned off sugar and carbs onto the ketogenic diet first, and then onto carnivore, if necessary, until their symptoms subside.

Elderly people can improve their mental faculties and regain memory:

“Ketone bodies, which are produced naturally by the human metabolism in the absence of glucose or reduced presence of glucose, have a neuroprotective impact on aging brain cells. Ketones improve mitochondrial function and reduce tissue inflammation. This reduced inflammation also improves digestion and autoimmunity, so can also maintain healthy brain tissue.” – Coach Elizabeth B., carnivore.diet

At any age and stage, people find their brains become sharper and more focused. No drugs needed!

High blood sugar damages the brain because the brain cells develop insulin resistance as well as the rest of the body. This leads to impaired ability to regulate metabolism, as well as impaired cognition and mood.

So many illnesses and chronic conditions appear to be the result of one root cause: The Wrong Human Diet.

The Carnivore Diet Meal Plan

Here I’d like to include a sample menu so you can see what a day on carnivore might look like:

  • 1st Meal of the Day: Eggs in butter, any style, with bacon. Coffee with butter and salt. No sweeteners.
  • 2nd Meal of the Day: Tuna fish or salmon patties, made with canned fish well mixed with an egg and fried in lots of butter. Salt to taste. Water, tea, coffee. No sugar substitutes.
  • 3rd Meal of the Day: Ribeye steak, burgers, and/or hot dogs. Cheese is optional. Zero carb beverage such as sparkling water.

Notice anything? That’s right! There are no limits on how much you may eat at a meal. Eat till full is the rule! Another rule is to eat fatty meats. In the case of fish, you can add fat using butter or bacon drippings.

It seems Carnivarians usually end up feeling so full that they drop one of these meals after a short while on the diet. It is so easy to do intermittent fasting with carnivore, it just happens naturally.

A Carnivore Diet Food List

Here is a list of the foods you can choose from:

  • Beef
  • Pork
  • Lamb
  • Venison
  • Bison
  • Elk
  • Organ Meats
  • Poultry
  • Eggs
  • Animal Fats
  • Cured Meats, no added sugar, carbs, or MSG
  • Bacon
  • Hot dogs
  • Fresh or Canned Fish
  • Seafood and Shellfish
  • Deli Meats and Sausages
  • Jerkies and Meat Sticks, no carbs, no MSG
  • Pork Rinds, plain, no sugars, no MSG
  • Caviar
  • Meat Broths
  • Butter
  • Cheeses, low carb (keep to a minimum)

Nothing sweet is allowed but use as much salt as you like.

If any food disagrees with you, just leave it out. This is sometimes called an Elimination Diet. You should pay attention to the effect foods have on your body and remove those that cause congestion, runny nose, indigestion, low energy, or other problems.

Note: You may have constipation or diarrhea in the first week as your body gets used to the new diet. Your gut microbiome will be changing over to its new environment. Extra fats in the diet may also cause loose stools. Don’t panic, just adjust accordingly and go forward.

The waste products from a carnivore diet are much less than from a plant-based diet. It is normal to pass stools two or three times a week. They’ll be much smaller too. Just another benefit!

Carnivore Diet Results

The results of a carnivore diet are ongoing. People report greater levels of healing the longer they stay on the diet. The first thing to go is the excess water (edema) your body was holding due to high sugar/glycogen levels. Carbohydrates cause the body to store extra water. When we eat carbs, the energy that we don’t use right away is stored as glycogen. Each gram of glycogen comes with three grams of water attached.

You can see this happening even in the first and second weeks. And less edema means lower blood pressure. In fact, you may want to supplement with electrolyte drops to replace potassium and magnesium, especially.

Weight loss is another measurable result even in the first week. It is so encouraging!

Inflammation throughout the body begins to fade away. As a result, all the chronic conditions associated with inflammation begin to resolve as well. Pain, sore joints, chronic headaches, skin conditions, bowel inflammation from plant lectins, and autoimmune disorders will heal according to case studies.

Mood disorders and low energy are replaced with a cheerful outlook and steady, even energy.

Yes, it sounds like the mythical magic wand, but its not. It is simply replacing a harmful diet with, as Dr. Ken Berry says, a Proper Human Diet.

Dr. Anthony Chaffee in a YouTube interview with Kelly Hogan made the following statement:

“95% of the results from the carnivore diet come from letting go of the last 5%” (of carbs, the old way of eating and drinking)

This is huge. As soon as you feel ready, go all in! Get those great results!

The healing will continue throughout the weeks and months. I’m into my second month at this point, and I have lost significant weight and inches; I feel younger and have great energy. I need less sleep. I’m more motivated and creative. Nails and hair are growing faster. Most people say they’re hooked after the first month, and I’m one of them! I can’t wait to see what will heal next!

One more thing … food no longer controls my body or my thoughts. I eat when I’m hungry and stop when I’m full. Then I don’t think about food again until the next time I’m hungry. I’ve wanted this all my life: total freedom from cravings and food obsession!

Carnivore Diet for Mental Health

Yes. The carnivore diet heals mental health issues. From anxiety and depression all the way to full-blown schizophrenia. I know that’s a lot to say. But research proves it. The case studies and personal accounts are proving it. The evidence is stacking up in favor of carnivore: this diet heals the brain!

I first found Dr. Chris Palmer on an interview with Dr. Shawn Baker. Dr. Palmer, MD is a psychiatrist who received his medical degree from Washington University School of Medicine. He did his internship and psychiatric residency at McLean Hospital, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Harvard School of Medicine. He is the author of a brand-new book called Brain Energy in which he teaches how ketogenic diets heal the brain from mental illnesses including schizophrenia, bipolar, borderline personality disorder, anxiety, depression, and more. His book is due out in November of 2022.

If you don’t know, any diet that puts you into ketosis is a keto genic diet. That covers Keto (20 grams or less of carbs/day) and Carnivore (zero carbs/day).

This is truly the high calling of the carnivore diet: the ability to heal the mind. It struck home with me because I have two family members who are afflicted with severe mental disabilities. Dr. Palmer’s mission is to spread the word and educate mental health professionals as well as everyday folks like us. We don’t have to live with these disabilities anymore!

I’m excited for the future by all the promise that the carnivore diet holds for people. I’m blown away by the incredible healing, both physical and mental, that eating a pure meat diet can bring. It will literally change our lives!

Meaty Facts about Cholesterol

Let’s look at cholesterol, which has enjoyed the status of being the number-one dietary supervillain for at least the past 50 years. Our interpretation of its role has gone through a dramatic change over the last several decades. The fact that we’re still unsure what cholesterol’s functions are and what significance low and high levels may mean should indicate that we still have a very long way to go to full understanding.

 

Common wisdom regarding cholesterol, whether total or LDL cholesterol, has been that if it’s high, you’re at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. Certainly, there is a great deal of scientific theory to back that up. Much of the research comes from associational studies that look at populations and compare rates of heart disease with corresponding cholesterol levels. The evidence includes a number of animal studies, and drug trials have demonstrated that lowering cholesterol can decrease the incidence of disease.

Many of these studies have been repeated multiple times with similar results; therefore, perhaps the theory should stand. Indeed, often when someone’s blood test comes back with an elevated cholesterol level, the doctor almost automatically offers a drug to lower cholesterol. Heck, I remember when I was a medical student many years ago, I often overheard the attending physicians joking about how popular cholesterol-lowering statin drug Lipitor should be placed in the water supply because all the lazy, fat patients needed to be on it. That’s how commonplace treating high cholesterol with drugs had become.

 

So, let me make a simple observation about conclusions that come from an associational study. Let’s assume you have a study that says people with elevated levels of cholesterol have a higher risk of heart disease. Fair enough—certainly there’s data to support that. But what if you ask, “Does that association hold up in all people in all situations?” That’s a simple question, but it drives a lot of thought and gets at the heart of some of the problems with this type of science. Suppose I could gather a subset of people who have elevated cholesterol but who also are profoundly insulin sensitive; they’re also very lean and have low levels of systemic and vascular inflammation. Does the association still hold? Or if it does, is it so small, in light of those other factors, that it’s rendered insignificant?

 

Let’s use some arbitrary numbers and say that risk of heart disease goes up 20 percent if you have an LDL higher than 130, but it goes down 150 percent if your insulin is lower than 3. Heart disease goes down another 85 percent if your waist is smaller than your height, and it goes down a further 120 percent if you have a C-reactive protein (a marker of inflammation) level lower than 1.0. In this theoretical situation, your risk for heart disease would be very favorable in the big picture. Now, many would be tempted to suggest that we should lower the risk even more by getting the cholesterol down by using drugs or perhaps a low-fat diet. Certainly, that strategy might be beneficial if all the other factors also remain favorable. But what happens if they don’t? What happens if going on the low-fat diet causes your insulin to rise or your C-reactive protein to go up? What happens if you take a drug and the side effects cause you to gain weight, and your waist expands? Those are questions we need to ask.

 

Also, we have a mounting pile of evidence that shows that heart disease risk is more influenced by other factors, including things like hyperinsulinemia, inflammatory status, and triglyceride levels, than it is by cholesterol levels. One interesting group of people that have been studied are those who have a genetic variant that leads to something called familial hypercholesterolemia. Basically, many of these people walk around with sky-high cholesterol levels, but they don’t die of heart disease any more frequently than anyone else; people with this condition have normal life expectancies. If they have unfavorable insulin levels, the story is different: heart attack city. This implies that high cholesterol by itself is insufficient to cause cardiovascular disease, which should be no surprise because we are complex systems that are affected by myriad interrelated variables.

 

Dave Feldman, a wonderful citizen scientist, has been demonstrating that our cholesterol levels can change by up to 100 points in a matter of a few days based on nothing more than what that person has eaten in the preceding few days. An interesting study shows that cholesterol rises by about 36 percent when a person fasts for one week. Now, under the assumption that meat is bad for us because it can cause cholesterol to rise (which it can) then does that also mean that eating nothing is equally bad for us?

 

The assumption is that low cholesterol is always a good thing when it comes to preventing heart disease; because heart disease is our number-one killer, that’s where our focus should be. Plus, we have some pretty cool drugs that lower cholesterol and are worth billions of dollars. (But I’m sure no one was concerned about the money to be made from those drugs, right?) However, what about the role of cholesterol outside the discussion of heart disease? What part does it play in our bodies? What effect does it have on things like all-cause mortality? What about diseases like cancer and certain neurodegenerative diseases? Entire books are dedicated to this stuff, but I’ll touch on it briefly here. (Believe me, I really want to get back to talking about steaks, but I need to at least mention this stuff.)

 

Your entire body—every single cell you have—contains cholesterol. That’s the major difference between defining a plant cell and an animal cell. (I used to laugh when I’d see advertisements on plant products pointing out the fact that they were “cholesterol free.” Well, duh; of course—because they’re plants.) Your brain uses something like 25 percent of your body’s cholesterol, and many of your hormones are made from it. Cholesterol is integral to the structure of every cell in your body. You can easily find studies that link low cholesterol to depression, violence, suicide, and neurodegenerative diseases. Some studies report that people tend to die younger if they have low cholesterol. Some cancers have been linked to low cholesterol. Infectious disease can be more difficult to fight when cholesterol levels are low.

 

If you list some of the major associative factors that are believed to be a contributor to heart disease, you will find the relative effect of cholesterol level to be relatively lower on that list. If you then stratified those factors by things that can be most efficiently adjusted with drugs rather than through lifestyle changes, you would see cholesterol at the top of that list. Not surprisingly, billions of dollars have been focused on the factor that’s drug-modifiable, whereas the lifestyle factors largely receive lip service.

 

Suffice it to say that I don’t think that low cholesterol is necessarily a good thing. High cholesterol may be problematic in certain cases, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it always is. Some people will continue to be concerned about this particular particle or that particular subfraction of this or that lipid, and perhaps that concern and the knowledge it spawns will lead to the answer to immortality. Or perhaps we’ll just replace heart disease with cancer, dementia, or some other equally awful way to die.

 

The bottom line is this: You and I will likely die of heart disease or cancer regardless of the diet we choose. For example, data on vegan and vegetarian mortality indicates the number-one and number-two killers for that group are cancer and heart disease. Heart disease kills a lot of people, and most people die with so-called normal cholesterol.

 

It saddens me to see almost daily that so many people are examined with a simple annual blood lipid test and then offered a drug to lower their cholesterol based only on that test and no further investigation. The overprescribing of cholesterol medications largely comes down to a lack of time and education on the part of physicians. You can literally walk into your doctor’s office after having lost every ounce of fat on your body, feeling the best you have in decades, sporting excellent blood pressure and otherwise perfect metabolic markers, but if your annual blood test reveals high cholesterol, you’ll still leave the office with a prescription for some medication without any further discussion. In my view, that’s unacceptable, and it’s a sign of systemic laziness. We have to remember that our physiology is an incredibly complex system with far more going on than we can hope to find out with a snapshot of what’s traveling in our blood at one particular instant.

 

Today, it’s encouraging to see more and more patients challenging some of the knee-jerk reaction of their doctors, and the patients are asking for more information. Remember that no one has more at stake regarding your health than you do. Be a pain in the ass; ask for more details and more testing. Challenge your physician to up his game. I’ve learned more from patients than I ever learned from any textbook.

 

 

Excerpted from The Carnivore Diet, By Dr. Shawn Baker.

Learn more HERE

 

Meat: The Ultimate Superfood

Why is meat such a staple across cultures? Because human life demands it, and it’s one of our most primitive needs. Eating meat is as vital to our survival as breathing. If we don’t provide our bodies with a regular supply, then our bodies begin to cannibalize our tissues to make up for the deficit. That’s when the slow reabsorption of body tissues begins, and we start to see issues like sarcopenia, which is the loss of muscle mass. We lose bone mass, which is about 40 percent protein. Our production of vital hormones, neurotransmitters, and basic cell functions start to fail. Eventually, our very existence becomes one of daily pain, weakness, and despair.
People who’ve adopted all-meat diets often report feeling two or three decades younger. Their chronic pains go away, their desire for life returns, and their diseases resolve or remit. For some people, the changes have been downright miraculous. People who have given up on life and suffer chronic depression have seen profound reversals in their mental states. For the first time in memory, they find that they’re happy and looking forward to life. Let’s talk about why these changes may happen.
Meat offers a tremendous amount of nutrition, even though it’s vilified for having cholesterol and saturated fat (which are vital components of the human body). As I like to remind people, meat is made of basically the same stuff that we are made of. If you want to build a car and you have access to a pile of car parts or a pile of computers, from which one would you draw your supplies? I can take all the nutrients from a rib-eye steak, which is made up of a bunch of animal cells, and then turn them into whatever my body needs.
Yes, we have a limited capacity to turn material from plants into what we need, but the process is much less efficient than drawing nutrients from meat, and it comes with some drawbacks. Meat is rich in several unique compounds found exclusively, or almost exclusively, in animal-based foods. These compounds include carnitine, carnosine, creatine, taurine, retinol, and vitamins B12, D3, and K2. These compounds offer some tremendous benefits.

Carnosine
Carnosine’s antiglycating properties can help mitigate the development of things like Alzheimer’s disease, atherosclerosis, and renal disease. Muscle levels of carnosine are significantly higher in people who eat meat compared to the levels in their vegetarian counterparts. By some accounts, carnosine may be one of the most potent antiaging molecules known.

Carnitine
Like carnosine, carnitine is found almost exclusively in animal products, especially red meat. Carnitine has several potentially beneficial effects in preventing and improving diseases. It has been shown to help with anemia, particularly for anemia associated with kidney dysfunction. It appears to improve the body’s use of glucose, and it may reduce the effects of diabetic peripheral neuropathy. In heart attack patients, carnitine has been used to prevent ischemia in cardiac muscle, and it’s even been shown to assist with resolving male infertility via an improvement in sperm quality.

Creatine
Creatine (a supplement athletes commonly use and one of the few that’s been found to be beneficial after being rigorously tested), is another product found only in meat. Meat eaters register higher levels of creatine, and when vegetarians supplement creatine, they experience improved cognitive function. It’s also interesting to note that patients with Alzheimer’s disease have lower levels of creatine. Heart failure patients who receive creatine have shown improved overall performance, and type 2 diabetics who supplement with creatine have improved glycemic control, particularly when they also exercise.

Taurine
Taurine is found in high levels in both meat and fish but is woefully absent from a plant-based diet. As you might expect, taurine levels are significantly lower among herbivorous humans. In animal studies, taurine has been shown to reduce anxiety. Perhaps that is one reason so many folks on a carnivore diet report a sense of calmness and a resolution of anxiety. Taurine is similar to carnosine and has been shown to inhibit glycation. It’s also a powerful antioxidant. Some evidence suggests that taurine contributes to preventing the development of diabetic renal disease.

Zinc
Although zinc is not exclusive to animal products, it’s found in much greater quantity and is more highly bioavailable in meat, and numerous plants containing phytates interfere with zinc’s absorption. Accordingly, zinc levels are fairly low in vegan and vegetarian dieters. Zinc deficiency has been associated with poor learning capacity, apathy, and behavioral problems in children. In adult males, low levels of zinc are associated with erectile dysfunction and decreased sperm counts. Zinc also is essential in the formation of insulin and appears to have a protective effect in preventing coronary artery disease and cardiomyopathy.

Vitamin B12
Vitamin B12, also known as cobalamin, is found exclusively in animal products, and experts advise people who abstain from meat to supplement it. One of the more common causes of deficiency is gastrointestinal malabsorption. Up to 62 percent of pregnant vegan women were noted to be deficient in B12, and up to 86 percent of vegan children and 90 percent of vegan elderly were B12-deficient. A deficit of vitamin B12 has been associated with several neurological diseases, including dementia; it’s also related to depression.

Heme Iron
Heme iron is another mineral found in abundance in red meat but absent from nonmeat sources. Unsurprisingly, a 2015 study of vegetarian women saw a 100 percent rate of some degree of iron deficiency anemia, which was more than double the rate of deficiency in their omnivorous counterparts. Certain plants, like leafy greens, soybeans, and lentils, contain non-heme iron, but those plants also can contain compounds like phytates and oxalates that limit iron absorption. Deficiency of iron has been shown to result in impairments in cognition and mental health status and a sense of general fatigue.
On average, people who include meat in their diets generally have better vitamin and mineral status than those who do not, and the vast majority of nutritional deficiency problems are in parts of the world where access to meat is scarce. In impoverished locations where meat is abundant, it’s not common to see nutritional deficiencies, whereas in poorer areas where people rely on a plant-based diet, residents frequently suffer from stunted growth and have numerous nutritional deficiency syndromes. Meat is indeed, a superfood!

Excerpted from The Carnivore Diet, By Dr. Shawn Baker.
Learn more HERE

Cure Chronic Conditions with Bacon and a Steak

The top three issues I’ve observed being improved by a carnivore diet are joint pain, digestive health, and mental health. The likely reason for this is because these issues are among the most common ailments. Mental health disorders are often given a special place in the landscape of human disease, probably because of the emotional turmoil associated with them. However, mental health issues are just diseases, as diabetes and arthritis are. Given that, no one should get upset when someone suggests that nutrition may play a role in the development or mitigation of these diseases, but some people do. Why is it considered radical to suggest that a diet of processed seed oil, grains, and oxalates is linked to depression? I just don’t understand that reaction.
Examinations of depressed patients show that they often suffer from lower levels of carnitine than people who don’t suffer from depression. You might recall from earlier discussions that humans can produce carnitine, but when we eat meat, our levels of it tend to increase. It’s possible that the higher levels of carnitine are the reason so many people notice an improvement in mood after they’ve eaten a nice steak.
Low cholesterol levels also are associated with higher rates of depression, as well as violence and suicide. Hyperinsulinemia has been associated with some mental health disorders, and in my informal studies, we have seen that eating a carnivore diet is often very effective in improving insulin status. Gut issues and inflammation are other ailments that are highly associated with mental health status. Guess what—a carnivore diet helps in those areas as well.
In 1933, noted wilderness activist Robert Marshall wrote in his book Arctic Village that the people he lived with, who survived on caribou meat in the remote wilds of Northern Alaska, were the happiest civilization he had ever encountered. I had a patient who had spent eighteen years living off the land and surviving primarily on caribou meat in remote Alaska. There’s even a movie about her experience—The Year of the Caribou. She was eighty-three when I knew her, and she told me that the happiest she had ever been and the best health she had experienced was during that time in Alaska.
Vegan propagandists often claim meat is inflammatory, and to support their claims about inflammation, they sometimes cite a study that used an isolated situation in which meat was not the only variable. We have to remember that human physiology is an incredibly complex system, and you can’t take an isolated lab test or cell culture study and extrapolate it to the entire system.
The best way to see whether meat is inflammatory to the human body is to feed it, and nothing else, to humans for a prolonged period to find out what happens via both clinical and laboratory assessment. Contrary to what the vegans would like us to believe, as more and more people try out the carnivore diet, we have more evidence that meat is very much an anti-inflammatory diet.
Autoimmune diseases are strongly linked with gastrointestinal problems, and increased intestinal permeability may be one of the chief culprits. Some of the recent literature on this subject focuses on altering the microbiome—often by using probiotics—to affect the intestinal permeability. This technique has generally produced little success because the microbiome is incredibly responsive to diet, and if the diet isn’t altered, then the probiotic-induced shift in microbiome will likely be short-lived at best.
As I previously mentioned, some of the common food components that appear to cause gut permeability issues are plant oils, drugs and supplements, legumes, grains, dairy, and sweeteners. The carnivore diet pretty much excludes all these items, except occasional limited dairy for those who can tolerate it. It’s interesting to note that many people see a resolution of a variety of autoimmune conditions when they exclude those items from their diets.
Aside from the benefits that a carnivore diet has on autoimmune-related arthritis, it seems that a fairly high number of people also report improvement in the more common osteoarthritis. Conventional wisdom has been that osteoarthritis is a mechanical problem and a disease of “wear and tear.”
Recent studies indicate that pathophysiology of osteoarthritis has a much greater component of inflammation than previously thought, and perhaps it also has a relationship with gut permeability. A recent animal study has shown a link between carbohydrate consumption as a possible etiologic agent in osteoarthritis. So, I owe an apology to all the patients who I didn’t believe when they used to tell me that eating certain foods made their joints hurt.
Common conditions such as hypertension, type 2 diabetes, and obesity often get better on a carnivore diet. These same conditions sometimes improve on other low-carbohydrate and low-calorie diets. A decrease in vascular inflammation likely contributes to improved blood pressure; often, people who have high blood pressure see improvement within a few weeks of adjusting their diets.
Blood glucose stabilization typically occurs over several months. If we look at postprandial blood glucose readings of long-term carnivores, they tend to be very stable with no significant elevations, which is in contrast with what we see with most diabetics, who often have fairly wide swings in their blood glucose numbers. Likewise, overall insulin sensitivity seems to improve fairly consistently, based on observation of long-term carnivore dieters who have shared their data.
Excerpted from The Carnivore Diet, by Dr. Shawn Baker.
Learn more HERE

Ekaterina improved digestion, hormonal health and PCOS on carnivore diet

Hi!
I am Ekaterina, russian-speaking carnivore coach and live in Switzerland.
 
This is my story (sorry, i can’t write just in a few words
 
 

First of all I’m an ex-vegetarian (10 years) plus ex-vegan (5.5 years).

My health wasn’t perfect since my childhood: allergies to pollen and home animals, genetic psoriasis, super sensitive gut, digestive problems always, acne (especially during vegan phase), unexplained PCOS, amenorrhea.

First serious psoriasis attack was at 15 y/o – first hormonal and school stress. 

At 18 i became vegetarian and felt relative good. At 24 I got pregnant (shockingly to every body around , especially to doctors). The told me it was impossible to have health pregnancy and to give a birth. But it was a gift from heaven and my boy was born. Yes, not perfectly healthy: small, bilateral cryptorchidism, atopic dermatitis, food allergies . But he developed breastfeeding gut and quick.

After pregnancy i got very aggressive psoriasis attack, was hospitalized. Hormones, hormonal creams and so on… and  in 2 years after very low calorie diet of very high lean protein  (no fat) my psoriasis attacked me again… it was the first time when it appeared after sun exposure! Normally sun helps me.

So i decided to try veganism. And in the beginning during “vegan honeymoon” everything was fine for about 1-1.5 years. Psoriasis was  calm, no hormones, no medicines. But after 1.5-2 years of veganism a lot of digestive problems appeared, acne blossomed everywhere on my skin, herpes appeared every month… and bloating, farting, emotional unstability, no libido, insulin tummy, quick aging… i was 26-32 y/o during my vegan story. I tried everything from vegan diet: hclf, 90-10-10, raw vegan, fruitarian, banana islands, raw till four and so on… nothing helped longterm. Psoriasis started to come back. 

At one moment when i started to bleed during pooping… and felt miserable from all these gut cramps and pain… i decided to eat less frequent, and stopped at OMAD (one meal a day). It helped a lot!!! And that way i discovered ketosis 3 years ago. I started with vegan type of keto diet and quickly understood it was almost nothing to eat (thanks to soy allergy). And i started to eat fish once a week, after that cheese… during all these psychological transformations from understanding that veganism was wrong i started to learn science: anthropology, nutrition, physiology, history, quantum physics and so on… i understood the depth of stupidity of going vegan that ruins my health and health of my kid.

So keto helped. I lost a lot of  vegan weight , even too much. And vegetarian keto with salads, oils, nuts, fish and cheese (and tons of supplements!) made me very thin and sick: anemia, no periods, aggressive and nervous, non-healing ulcers on my fingers, very dry skin, some digestive issues … but almost no psoriasis!

Nowadays I’ve been proud and happy carnivore almost 18 months (from june 2018). No supplements. My digestion was never better than on this WOE. My skin glows, my psoriasis is in remissions with some plaques (they appear when i eat not enough fat and too much histamine rich variants of meat and fish). I have some issues with my periods, but no PCOS on ultrasound scan! I eat mostly meat, all types if them, fish and seafood, eggs, butter and organs from time to time. I am looking younger.

And appreciate this carnivorous way of living so much! Thank to meat-eating my son is very healthy and handsome. And his some autistic symptoms disappeared. His mood is stable,productivity in school and piano playing are fantastic, his anemia has gone. He is active and happy child! 

We are still going to the perfect health. And meat helps us!

Veganism was a huge mistake and missed steak!

Meat really heals!

Thank you so much for all you are doing for the world!!!

Sincerely yours 

Ekaterina (or just Kate)

Thomas heals from arthritis, autism, and skin psoriasis on a carnivore diet

I have been autistic and dyslexia my whole life, but I was not diagnosed as being autistic until I was an adult. By the time I was about 44-45 I had arthritis in my neck, hands, lower back, and feet. I also had psoriasis which rapidly worsened when I started taking NSAIDs to manage the arthritic pain. Prior to this I worked out in the gym 5 days a week and yet I continued to gain body fat.

In early 2017 I went on a Ketogenic diet and my arthritis seemed to be gone in about 3 weeks or so and psoriasis that often bled through my clothes seemed to be greatly improved. I also noticed a vast improvement in cognitive function and a more stable mood.

By late 2017 I had moved to carnivore or a zero carb diet. The Psoriasis is not quite gone, but I think I will eventually figure out what the final trigger is and resolve this.

As for my autistic type symptoms, I seem to be far less likely to perseverate for long periods of time, my anxiety is a lot better, especially after I had been on carnivore for about 6 months or so I noticed that anxiety was much harder to trigger and it has less intensity to it. I have also noticed that the symptoms of dyslexia have improved, I am not able to often retain things like phone numbers in order with little or no effort. I can also tolerate sunlight much better. I also seem to have an easier time filtering out a noise and other distractions including tactile ones that constantly competed for my attention in the past.

I made a short video about it.

Christian improved hearing, gained weight, treated autism on carnivore diet

Hey everyone, I’m not really autistic anymore but I was before.

When I was 18 I was diagnosed with high-functioning autism, had all the normal issues: sensory overload, trouble communicating, temper problems. All standard autistic behaviour. However at times I had severe impairment. At times I could not speak for sometimes hour at a time, I noticed this was always accompanied by extreme abdominal pain and hunger then I precede by eating food (sugar, and grains) and the symptoms got worse, or loss of speech, hearing to a degree and some movement impairment, and always accompanied by sensory overload. After one episode I finally realised this is happening to me because of food, then I started to trial many different diets, all with relatively no success.

December 2017 I had a problem while paint and decorating with my father, I couldn’t move voluntary at times and would had a case of involuntary blinking and would have tears running down my face without being sad or upset. This left me confused and I was fed up so I stopped working. I always tried hard, I worked out, I thought I was eating healthy. I would eat so much fruit, but it would make my abdominal pain even worse. Nothing worked I tried everything, I even went to nutritionist and tried fasting.

So it was December 2017 and Shawn Baker was on the Joe Rogan podcast, you guys probably already watched it. Shawn Baker was advocating a meat only diet and said it cured a bunch of his ailments and increased his performance. I literally said “fuck it” I will try it, I got nothing to lose, I’m in pain and tried everything and this is depressing. Being autistic sucks because you cannot control what you do, your body does… You try grab the cup you can’t; you fumble, you try let go… but you can’t you are too tense. You are angry when you aren’t, and can’t talk when you talk…

So I tried this meat diet for 30 days and it went really well, best I ever felt in my life. Simple things like sugar crashes and feeling tired just disappeared. However as the time went on I started noticing: I’m not in pain anymore, I don’t have to stop and think when I speak, I’m looking at people in their face, I am calm and not raging when playing video games (I used to rage a lot). I can move how and when I want to, no more insatiable hunger.

Everything autism related just evaporated, it was like it was never there. I also never get nervous now at all.

I’m 25 years old. I’m now 1 year and 3 months carnivore, I mainly eat raw meat nowadays. I gained weight, I was always skinny 5 ft 10 140 lbs, now I am 170lbs and feel a lot better.

I was going to post this a year ago but couldn’t be bothered.

This story doesn’t detail everything but I tried to keep it short and simple.

Thank you for anyone that reads this and most importantly thank you Shawn Baker for changing my life!

Emily improves autism, mental health, and weight loss on a carnivore diet

I began a low carb diet after having my first child 7 years ago. Then after the birth of my second I switched to keto. I am a scientific-minded person with a master’s degree, and spent a lot of time working in the medical field and military. I was in love with the science, the benefits, and the results. I always noticed small symptoms of inflammation when I ate large amounts of veggies (even low carb). I cut them out.

Once I went carnivore, I not only got leaner, I also completely cured life long anxiety and depression. I’ve put my 5 year old son who is autistic on this diet, and he is now speaking (previously non-verbal) and is social and may lose his diagnosis. There is something significant to this and while I understand there is no money in it, more research needs to be done.

Connor improved his autism and IBS with the carnivore diet

I used to be a normal kid, outdoorsy, confident, popular. Then on my 11th birthday I got what seemed to just be gastro. While the worst of it passed in a couple of days, I never really got better. Not only did I suffer from IBS, but my personality radically changed too. I was angsty, introverted, paranoid and I was sensitive to light, sound and touch. I had become autistic. I wouldn’t be diagnosed until I was 19 because I didn’t present any of the usual symptoms in early childhood. Now at 27 I have been doing OMAD carnivore for eight months, I initially switched to this WOE to help with ME/CFS and while it has minimised my pain and fatigue, what I didn’t expect was a cure for autism. I was so certain it was simply a part of me, that I was born this way and I would die this way. And maybe that’s true for some people, but I realise now that my autism and IBS were caused by diet. If only I had known about this sixteen years ago!

 

Watch or listen to Connor’s interview on the MeatRx.com podcast below:

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