Can the digestible indispensable amino acid score methodology decrease protein malnutrition

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URL: https://academic.oup.com/af/article/9/4/18/5575466

Journal: Animal Frontiers

Publication Date: 9/2019

Summary: The new system for estimating protein quality of human foods, which is called “Digestible Indispensable Amino Acid Score” or DIAAS, allows for calculation of the amino acid quality of food proteins that are based on ileal digestibility rather than total tract digestibility and values for each amino acid may be calculated. By recognizing the pig as an appropriate model for determining DIAAS values in human food proteins, a procedure for the standardized measurement of DIAAS values in a large number of food proteins has been established. Because digestibility values for amino acids in individual food proteins are additive in mixed meals, DIAAS values for mixed meals may be calculated. By comparing DIAAS values of mixed meals to the requirements for digestible indispensable amino acid, the amino adequacy of the meal may be calculated. Animal proteins such as meat and milk have greater DIAAS values than plant proteins, but by complementing plant proteins with low DIAAS values with animal proteins with greater DIAAS values, balanced meals that are adequate in all amino acids can be provided.

Key Takeaways

By utilizing pigs as a model to determine how different sources protein are digested and absorbed in the gut, this study can make more accurate predictions about protein utilization in humans. Meat and milk proteins are more digestible and absorbable than plant proteins.

Animal Protein Sources Are More Digestible And Absorbable Than Plant Proteins

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