A randomized pilot study comparing zero-calorie alternate-day fasting to daily caloric restriction in adults with obesity.

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URL: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27569118

Journal: Obesity

Publication Date: 09/2016

Summary: To evaluate the safety and tolerability of alternate-day fasting (ADF) and to compare changes in weight, body composition, lipids, and insulin sensitivity index (Si) with those produced by a standard weight loss diet, moderate daily caloric restriction (CR). Adults with obesity (BMI ≥30 kg/m(2) , age 18-55) were randomized to either zero-calorie ADF (n = 14) or CR (-400 kcal/day, n = 12) for 8 weeks. Outcomes were measured at the end of the 8-week intervention and after 24 weeks of unsupervised follow-up. No adverse effects were attributed to ADF, and 93% completed the 8-week ADF protocol. At 8 weeks, ADF achieved a 376 kcal/day greater energy deficit; however, there were no significant between-group differences in change in weight (mean ± SE; ADF -8.2 ± 0.9 kg, CR -7.1 ± 1.0 kg), body composition, lipids, or Si. After 24 weeks of unsupervised follow-up, there were no significant differences in weight regain; however, changes from baseline in % fat mass and lean mass were more favorable in ADF. ADF is a safe and tolerable approach to weight loss. ADF produced similar changes in weight, body composition, lipids, and Si at 8 weeks and did not appear to increase risk for weight regain 24 weeks after completing the intervention.

Key Takeaways

When compared to calorie restriction diets, alternate day fasting diets resulted in similar changes in body composition, lipids, or insulin sensitivity. But, alternate day fasting resulted in a better ratio of lean mass to fat mass at the end of the study.

Why Alternate Day Fasting is Better Than Calorie Restriction

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1 thought on “A randomized pilot study comparing zero-calorie alternate-day fasting to daily caloric restriction in adults with obesity.”

  1. Is it too late to get in the carnivore study? I’ve been carnivore 98% of the time since 9/1/2019, I’ve never felt better, 51 year old firefighter.

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